Liquid Light Follow these directions!

http://www.instructables.com/id/The-Darkroom-Liquid-Light-Emulsion/?lang=es

http://photographyexchange.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/scream.jpg
Jean Yang Film 352: Film Materials and Processes Liquid light emulsion on ceramic plate Photography as an Object
"One can't look at seeing/One can't hear hearing.
Ektoras Binikos””One can’t look at seeing/One can’t hear hearing.”, 2002, Sculpture, Glass, liquid photo emulsion, polyurethane., 65 x 30 x 30 cm
"One can't look at seeing/One can't hear hearing"
Ektoras Binikos “”One can’t look at seeing/One can’t hear hearing””, 2002, Installation, Glass, liquid photo emulsion, polyurethane., 65 x 30 x 30 cm
Gary Emrich photo emulsion on eyeglasses
Gary Emrich Nebula Glasses
Gary Emrich comet glasses
Niagara Falls #3 Gary Emrich

 

 

 

 

Untitled
Ektoras Binikos”Untitled”, 2002, Sculpture, Liquid photo emulsion,polyurethane on vanity mirror., 10 x 20 cm

http://www.alternativephotography.com/wp/processes/liquid-emulsion/liquid-light-emulsion-on-wax     wow–liquid light on wax floaters in water (Ophelia idea)–love when objects are used in conceptual capacity when the photo transforms into sculpture 3d

http://www.lomography.com/magazine/lifestyle/2011/04/23/the-pinhegg-my-journey-to-build-an-egg-pinhole-camera    He puts liquid light inside eggs that are pinhole cameras–wanted camera and image to fuse with idea of creation! These are so cool!

 

Oh My isn’t this wonderful! http://www.tatanakellner.com/installations/while-you-were-sleeping  check out her website!

Tatana Kellner

 

LIQUID LIGHT ON EGGS–love this think it would make wonderful project–put images onto a doz

  http://www.sho-zs-photo.com/eggolution-images.html

http://www.sho-zs-photo.com/eggolution-of-ab-ovo.html   directions for putting interior of eggs

Albumen emulsion photographic transfer onto egg interiors by Shoshana Zambryski-Stachel
Shoshana Zambryski-Stachel

 liquid light onto objects:

https://hellsbelle84.wordpress.com/2011/02/    good info here

http://www.instructables.com/id/The-Darkroom-Liquid-Light-Emulsion/

http://jessicazeus.blogspot.com/2010/03/more-liquid-light.html

APPLYING LIQUID LIGHT:

Print out this handout:

Click to access VA93%20Liquid%20Light%20Handout.pdf

FOR USING LIQUID LIGHT ONTO MIRROR DO NOT USE VARNISH (glossy polyurethane oil based varnish-metal-plastic-wood) AS A PRE-COAT YOU MUST USE GELATIN SUBBING SOLUTION INSTRUCTIONS BELOW!:

Gelatin Precoat (Subbing)
This is a traditional process for making photographic emulsions like Liquid Light and Ag-Plus stick to glass and glazed ceramics. It consists of an extremely thin layer of gelatin coated on chemically-cleaned glass. Liquid Light bonds to this thin layer, fusing with the glass so that the image seems to be virtually embedded in the glass or ceramic surface. Is it worth the extra effort?
Subbing is more time-consuming than using glossy varnish. However, the materials for the process are easily available at grocery stores, and the extra effort pays off with the enhanced appearance of the print.
What materials should be “subbed”? The process is only for vitreous materials like glass, glazed
ceramics, fired porcelain, natural rocks, marble, etc. On glass-resembling plastics like Lucite and
Plexiglas, as well as on highly-porous materials like unglazed ceramics and plaster, do not use subbing;use glossy polyurethane varnish, following the instructions enclosed with Liquid Light.
Materials needed:
You will need some unflavored gelatin such as Knox, sold at grocery stores, plus some powdered
laundry detergent (do not use soap or dishwasher detergent, which leave a waxy film). Sprinkle one level teaspoon (approx. 3 grams) of gelatin onto the surface of one pint (450 cc’s) of cold water in a saucepan. Let it stand 15 minutes to swell the gelatin, then heat with stirring until the gelatin is dissolved (140º-160º F or 45º-56º C.)
Procedure:
Scrub and rinse the glass or ceramic (wearing rubber gloves) until the rinse water does not bead up as it drains off the glass but leaves a uniform, nearly- invisible film. Pour some of the hot gelatin mixture onto the material, drain well and dry overnight in a warm place with low humidity and circulating air. (The remainder of the gelatin-water solution can be discarded.)
Coating with emulsion:
The glass is now “subbed” and can be coated with emulsion. Pour a surplus of Liquid Light on the glass, tilt to spread, and pour the surplus back in the bottle. Set the glass or ceramic on a level surface with cool circulating air to speed setting and drying. The glass can be exposed while the Liquid Light is still damp or dried thoroughly and saved for future use

If using pre bought stretched canvas that has been primed with water-base gesso, it should be given a topcoat of alkyd primer or glossy polyurethane

 

Jill Enfield liquid light on tiles

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jason-landry/post_6747_b_4670041.html   David Prifti

2014-01-26-Prifti01.jpg
David Prifti Gaze, 2003, a 12×12 inch photo emulsion image on metal was the piece in this exhibition that drew me in. An old piece of metal — quite possibility the bottom of an old paint can is now the surface from which this woman’s face looks out at us.
2014-01-26-Prifti06.jpg
David Prifti

 

LIQUID LIGHT PROCESS DIRECTIONS:
The process where you can apply the process to a surface of your own choice.
Explained by Lloyd Godman

This is a silver-based sensitizer for applying on any surface, exposing by an enlarger, and processing in conventional chemistry. It is virtually the same emulsion found on ordinary photographic paper, but in a liquid form and can allow the emulsion to be coated on a wide range of surfaces.

Speed and Contrast When freshly-made, liquid light is relatively slow and lacks full contrast. As it ages, it becomes faster and more contrasty. You can obtain maximum speed and contrast at any stages by adding a small quantity of working developer to the emulsion, as described below.

The emulsion can leave black stains on working surfaces and needs to cleaned up immediately.

1Safe Light
Use a dark yellow, light amber or red safelight while coating but when emulsion is drying and for storage total darkness is recommended.
At room temperature, liquid light is a solid gel and before use the bottle must be soaked in a container of hot water until it becomes a liquid at about 110 Deg F. It is not necessary to melt the entire contents if only a portion is to be used as the mixture is of a similar consistency throughout and in fact shaking the bottle will cause bubbles to form which can effect the application of the emulsion. Use containers and tools made only from plastic, rubber, enamel, stainless steel or glass. (Other metals such as plain steel or brass may contaminate the emulsion. Temperature and humidity in the darkroom should be moderate.

2Increasing density and sensitivity
A small, precisely-measured amount of paper developer added to liquid light just before use will give maximum speed and contrast. Add exactly one part of working developer to 10 parts of liquid light. Example: Add 15ml of dektol, Neutol or equivalent diluted 1-2 (Not stock or concentrated solution) to 150ml of liquid light. Mix well, an coat this mixture during the same day. (Once coated and dried, material can be stored of an indefinite period).

3Applying liquid emulsion
Use a brush, small sponge or a nap type paint applicator, by using a paint roller, spray gun, or by flowing on the emulsion and draining off the excess. At the same time, coat a few pieces of paper or file cards with the same mixture to serve as test strips to calculate the correct exposure. Like paint, too thin a coating of liquid light will show streaks and brush stokes. If an even coating is required, two thin coats will cover better than one and the second can be applied after the first has become tacky or dried. As you are applying the solution, remember to keep the emulsion warm in a water bath as it will begin to set again if it becomes cool.

4Exposure
Liquid light can be exposed once it is dry by using an enlarger, contact printing, or by a slide projector. Liquid light is slower than normal enlargement papers and requires a longer exposure time. Suggested exposure for an 8×10 from a 35mm neg enlarged full frame is about 40sec @ f5.6. If using an enlarger for large works, you will need to reduce the amount of light projected on to the surface,and this can be done by tapping a piece of black stiff card over the front lens with a hole 1/8 inch diameter cut in the middle to act as a diaphragm that limits light out put and sharpens the image.

5Processing liquid emulsion – development
For preparations on paper, develop like a normal print in a tray, or for other surfaces paint the developer on with a brush or sponge. A developer like Dektol or Neutol should be used diluted 1 part with 2 parts water. It is important that while the temperature of the developer is warm it is not above 70 deg F or 21 deg C. to avoid melting of the emulsion. For large surfaces where the developer must be applied to a portion of the print at a time, even out the development by first wetting the emulsion with cool water.

6Fixing
Do not rinse with water or use a stop bath after developing. Use two consecutive identical hardening fixer baths. The first acts as a short stop; immerse for a few seconds to neutralize the developer. Next place in the second bath for 10 min or more until the chalky white pigment disappears, leaving the highlights completely transparent. (The second fixer should always be new and some agitation should be used).

7Washing
Wash in the normal manner for at least 10 min in running water.

 

// SURFACE PREPARATION 1//

*ALL MATERIAL IS TAKEN FROM “SILVER GELATIN: A USER’S GUIDE TO LIQUID PHOTOGRAPHIC EMULSIONS” BY MARTIN REED AND SARAH JONES

BEFORE APPLYING EMULSION YOU HAVE TO MAKE SURE THAT:

  1. SURFACE IS CLEAN.
  2. SURFACE IS PREPARED [IT MAY NEED SOME TO HELP THE EMULSION TO ADHERE]

THERE ARE THREE TYPES OF ADHESION:

  1. MECHANICAL [PHYSICAL]
  2. DIFFUSION [IN MOLECULAR LEVEL]
  3. ELECTRICAL [AN ELECTRICAL CHARGE CAN BE USED TO OXIDIZE THE SURFACE OF SOME MATERIALS, ENABLING A CHEMICAL BOND TO BE PRODUCED THAT WOULD NOT OTHERWISE OCCUR]

CLEANING AND DE-GREASING THE SURFACE

A SIMPLE TEST FOR CLEANLINESS FOR METALS AND PLASTICS IS TO APPLY A FILM OF WATER AND CHECK HOW IT ACCEPTED THE SURFACE. IF IT BREAKS INTO BEADS FURTHER PREPARATION IS REQUIRED.

  1. MECHANICAL CLEANING – INCLUDES REMOVAL OF SURFACE DUST AND DEBRIS, AND POSSIBLY THE USE OF A SCOURING AGENT SUCH AS HOUSEHOLD ABRASIVE CLEANER TO LIGHTLY ABRADE THE SURFACE.
  2. DETERGENT – USING DETERGENT AS AN INITIAL PREPARATION IS SIMPLE, NO-HAZARDOUS, AND APPLICABLE TO MOST TYPES OF POTENTIAL BASE MATERIAL
  3. CHEMICAL – A CLEANING SOLUTION CAN BE MADE BY DISSOLVING ABOUT 25G OF SODA HYDROXIDE (CAUSTIC SODA) IN A LITRE OF WATER.
  4. SOLVENTS – SOLVENTS FOR FATS AND OILS CAN BE USEFUL CLEANSING AGENTS, BUT THEY MUST BE USED THOROUGHLY AND SUFFICIENTLY OR THE GREASE CAN ME MERELY REDISTRIBUTED OVER THE SURFACE. ALCOHOL AND ACETONE ARE TWO EXAMPLES.

SUBBING


SUBBING IMPLIES ANY SURFACE PREPARATION TREATMENT PRIOR THE EMULSION COATING, PARTICULARLY FOR SMOOTH-SURFACED MATERIALS. THERE ARE TWO KINDS OF SMOOTH SURFACES :

  1. SMOOTH SURFACES TO WHICH EMULSION WILL NOT ADHERE TO UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES WITHOUT SURFACE PREPARATION – THIS INCLUDES MANY PLASTICS
  2. SMOOTH SURFACES TO WHICH EMULSION WILL ADHERE WELL WHEN DRY, BUT POORLY IN THE WET STATE, INCLUDING GLASS AND GLAZED CERAMICS.

GELATIN SUBBING SOLUTION

THIS IS A DILUTE SOLUTION OF GELATIN, PREFERABLY HARDENED WITH CHROME ALUM  (CAN USE SILVERPRINT SUBBING SOLUTION & EMULSION HARDENER), WHICH CAN BE APPLIED TO A BASE THAT IS NORMALLY DIFFICULT TO EMULSION-COAT DIRECTLY, PARTICULARLY GLASS AND CERAMICS.

GELATIN IS PERHAPS THE MOST ARCHIVALLY SOUND AGENT FOR SUBBING ANY SURFACE, AND AS THE BOND WITH THE EMULSION IS A GELATIN, THE KEYING BETWEEN SUBBING AND EMULSION IS EXCELLENT.

RELATED MATERIALS AT SILVERPRINT STORE :

HTTP://WWW.SILVERPRINT.CO.UK/PRODUCTBYGROUP.ASP?PRGRP=43

VARNISHES AS SUBBING LAYER


A SUITABLE VARNISH MUST ADHERE WELL TO THE BASE WHILE ACTING AS A GOOD BASE FOR THE EMULSION, AND MUST WITHSTAND TEMPERATURE AND LIGHT VARIATIONS WITHOUT BLISTERING OR YELLOWING. VARNISHES SOLD FOR PROTECTING OIL PAINTINGS ARE SUITABLE AND ONE THAT STOOD OUT IN OUT OWN TESTS WAS GRIFFIN VARNISH MANUFACTURED BY WINSOR & NEWTON. DILUTION IS USUALLY UNNECESSARY, HOWEVER, SMALL AMOUNTS OF WHITE SPIRIT CAN BE ADDED TO ALLOW A SMOOTHER FLOW WHEN APPLYING BY BRUSH.

POLYURETHANE VARNISH


THIS IS MUCH USED AS A SUBBING TREATMENT FOR MANY TYPES OF SURFACE AND CAN WORK WELL, BUT HAS A TENDENCY TO YELLOW ON PROLONGED EXPOSURE TO LIGHT, AND DISPLAYS A SLIGHTLY YELLOW BASE COLOUR EVEN WHEN FRESHLY APPLIED. IT IS WIDELY AVAILABLE AND RELATIVELY LOW IN PRICE. MATT VARNISH WILL BE THE MOST SUITABLE, OFFERING THE BEST KEY TO THE EMULSION.

ALKYD PRIMER


ALKYD PRIMER IS A BRIGHT WHITE OIL-BASED PAINT THAT HAS GOOD ARCHIVAL PROPERTIES, AND IT IS STANDARD PREPARATION FOR ARTIST’S CANVAS. USED UNDILUTED IT WILL TEND TO FILL THE PORES OF THE FABRIC, GIVING A SMOOTH , LEATHERY TEXTURE AND A HIGH DEGREE OF BRIGHTNESS THAT WILL GIVE MAXIMUM TONAL RANGE TO THE FINAL RESULT. IF THE TEXTURE NEEDS TO SHOW MORE CLEARLY, IT CAN BE PROGRESSIVELY DILUTED WITH WHITE SPIRIT.

DIRECTIONS FROM LIQUID LIGHT SITE–ROCKLAND–Although most artists prefer SILVERPRINT to LIQUID LIGHT

SURFACE PREPARATION Some materials require surface preparation for good adhesion: Non -absorbent materials like metals and plastics need an oil -base pre -coat. For a transparent pre -coat, use semi-glossy or glossy polyurethane varnish (not matte). For an opaque pre -coat, use alkyd (oil -base) house paint or household enamel . These are sold at hardware and paint stores. Do not use acrylics, latex, gesso, lacquer, shellac, artist’s tube paints or aerosol coatings, all of which may give poor adhesion.

Glass and ceramics only: These can be pre -coated with polyurethane varnish as described above, but a better way is the gelatin pre -coat (next page) that literally fuses the emulsion to the ceramic . Use it only with glazed (vitreous) materials like glass, china, glazed ceramics, porcelain and rock; not with glass -like materials like Plexiglas, Lucite or plastic, which should receive a polyurethane pre -coat . (An alternative technique is to use Armour Etch which can be applied to the edges to bond the emulsion and prevent water from possibly seeping in. When using the product on glass, the edges will look frosted so may need to be matted.) Paper and fabrics: These do not require any preparation, and emulsion can be coated directly onto them. Two coats are usually necessary (see coating instructions.) Highly absorbent materials like raw plaster, bisque ceramics, cement, wood, bricks, etc. require surface preparation to prevent the processing chemicals from soaking in and causing discoloration or fading. These materials should be pre -coated with glossy oil – base polyurethane varnish or alkyd paint as described above.

Artist’s canvas: If primed with acrylic gesso, it should be given a top coat of alkyd paint or glossy polyurethane as described above. If unprimed, or primed with oil -based gesso, the emulsion can be coated directly over.

Acetates: There is a type of film called Dura -Lar wet media, available at art supply stores, which the emulsion will stick to without further prep. Otherwise, use glossy oil based polyurethane as an intermediate coat.

Gelatin pre-coat (subbing) for glass and glazed ceramics: You will need some powdered laundry detergent and some unflavored gelatin such as the Knox brand. These items are sold at larger grocery stores. Scrub the glass or ceramic with hot water and powdered detergent until the rinse water does not bead up but leaves a uniform film when drained off. At this stage, the glass is chemically-clean. Sprinkle 1 level teaspoon (5 grams) of gelatin onto the surface of one cup (250 cc) of cold water. Allow it to swell for 5 minutes or more, then heat to melt the gelatin. Pour some of the hot solution over the chemically-cleaned glass. Drain completely and dry thoroughly before coating with emulsion.

COATING AND EXPOSING

Small areas: The easiest way to coat is to pour on a surplus of emulsion, spread it to the edges with a fingertip and pour the surplus emulsion back in the bottle, leaving enough to make an opaque white coat. Lay the material on a flat surface until the emulsion sets up or becomes sticky. (Cool air will shorten setup time.) It can then be stood on end and dried with an electric fan.

Large areas: Keep the emulsion in a container of hot water so that it stays liquid. On absorbent surfaces like paper, use a soft brush or other means of spreading it. Let stand a few minutes until it absorbs the emulsion, then give a second coat at right angles to the first.

Exposing: The emulsion can be exposed and processed while still damp, or when dried. A suggested trial exposure time at full aperture is 20 seconds for an 8×10 inch print. Determine exposure with a test strip consisting of a few drops of emulsion spread on a file card. Differently dated batches may exhibit different sensitivity.

Using a projector: For large prints like wall murals, artist’s canvas and other oversized surfaces when an enlarger does not give enough light, a slide projector can be used. To sharpen the image, tape a doughnut of black paper having an approximately 3/8 inch hole over the front of the projector lens, or use a polarizing filter.

PROCESSING Develop with Kodak Dektol diluted 1 part to 2 parts of water, or other paper developer. Do not use film developer. For lower contrast, use Kodak Selectol-Soft. Develop in a tray at 68°-70°F for 11 /2 minutes. If the print is large, use a sponge or soft brush that is soaked in developer, or a refillable spray dispenser. (Note: A temporary “tray” to hold processing solutions can be made out of a large-size stretched canvas.) After development, do not rinse with water or use an acid shortstop, either of which will soften the emulsion. Instead, set aside a portion of fixer for use as a shortstop to neutralize the developer. Immerse the print a few seconds in this solution and drain before placing in the main body of fixer. (Used fixer can be used for this step).

Fix with a hardening fixer. For best results, use Kodak Fixer or other hypo-based hardening fixer rather than a rapid fixer, which may fade the image. Fix until all the chalky white areas become transparent— from 5 to 10 minutes. The function of the fixer is to wash away unused silver compounds, so it should be used generously and with frequent agitation. Fix until the emulsion becomes leathery to the touch. (Fixing will turn the emulsion transparent, which may be mistaken for fogging if the emulsion is coated on a dark surface.) Wash at least 5 minutes in cool running water. Blot and dry. After drying, a wrinkled print can be flattened by pressing with a household iron or dry-mount press on low-heat setting.

Adding Color: The color and texture of the material underneath are visible through the highlights of an emulsion print. For added color, prints can be toned or tinted like conventional black & white prints. They can be hand-colored with watercolors, oil paints, acrylics, or virtually any other type of paint. Protect the surface only if it will be displayed outdoors. For best protection, coat the dried print thinly with a water-based polyurethane finish. (not the same as oil-based polyurethane used as a pre-coat.) Any other type of lacquer or solvent-based coating can be used. For display indoors, no protective coating is needed.

Cleanup: Emulsion that has not been hardened by fixing can be removed with hot water. Hardened emulsion can be dissolved with dilute household bleach.

TROUBLESHOOTING

Fogged emulsion: To test for fogging, spread a few drops of emulsion on a file card and develop one minute without exposing. The emulsion should stay white. Be sure the safelight is correct; an amber safelight can cause fogging with Liquid Light VC.

Weak blacks: Absorbent materials like paper or cloth may soak up the first coat of emulsion, requiring an extra coat after the first has been absorbed.

Not enough contrast: Contrast can be increased by super-sensitizing: Before coating, add exactly one part of working Dektol solution (diluted 1 to 2) to 10 parts of emulsion. Use this mix the same day. Sensitivity will also increase, so use a test strip.

Specks on paper: Some papers have impurities that can contaminate the emulsion if it stays on them overnight or longer. Remedy: coat and process the same day.

Uneven development: If dried for future use, for uniform development the emulsion should be dried completely with warm circulating air, not in a closed box.

Stains or fading: Not long enough fixing or washing to penetrate the emulsion. Emulsion is a liquid at room temperature: Normally, emulsion is a solid gel at room temperature (around 70°F). If in a liquid state, it indicates prolonged freezing and will not give good adhesion.

 

 REMEMBER:

-when processing image that is coated in liquid light don’t use stop bath–just 2 fixer baths with first fixer bath acting as stop

-Coat with safelight but store in darkness

-use only when completely dry

-prep certain surfaces with poly varnish -oil based–semi gloss or gloss–griffins or golden’s varnish is good for that– 

to coat finished liquid light pieces for exterior exhibitions or further protection– this varnish fist coat in gloss and another coat in matt–is a good choice  http://www.dickblick.com/items/00628-1215/

-bring black light tight box or bags for transport and storage of sensitized objects or papers or fabrics

 TIPS FOR OTHER SURFACES: On glass-plastic-metal- and mirror use subbing solution from Silverprint vas the ‘key’. Clean glass really well using washing soda then coat with subbing solution as directed. All this can be done in the light, the coat on liquid light in safe light conditions.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s